Email from AOC on CourtNet 2.0. Not just for Kentucky Lawyers. Now available to media outlets.

The AOC invites you to subscribe to CourtNet 2.0, the application that
allows you to search Kentucky court cases online 

        
The Administrative Office of the Courts invites your media outlet to subscribe to CourtNet 2.0, a program that provides near real-time, online access to Kentucky civil and criminal cases. The AOC is now ready to offer CourtNet 2.0 subscriptions to media statewide after a pilot rollout to several media outlets.
The application offers sophisticated features, including:
 
  • Flexible search engine
  • Active and inactive cases
  • Detailed case information
  • Ability to save searches for later review
  • Ability to re-execute last 10 searches
  • Visual flags for warrants, summonses and failure to appear
 
CourtNet 2.0 is the first major upgrade to CourtNet in the last decade and was developed in-house at the AOC. The AOC began a staggered statewide implementation of CourtNet 2.0 in 2013 and today CourtNet 2.0 has nearly 6,000 users. It is available to members of the Kentucky Bar Association; justices, judges, circuit court clerks and court personnel in the Judicial Branch; and all agencies in the Executive and Legislative branches. 
 
Subscription Plans
Subscriptions start at only $15 per month. There is a charge for each image (PDF) that is viewed/
downloaded and a charge for each case searched over the number allowed within a specific plan. The person who serves as the administrator of your account can add other users (subaccounts) for $10 per month per user. You can change your plan at the end of the monthly billing period if you need more or fewer searches. 
 
How to Subscribe to CourtNet 2.0
To subscribe to CourtNet 2.0, email the information below to courtnetadmin@kycourts.net. You will receive an email acknowledging your request. Within three to five business days, you will receive another email with information on how to set up an account online. You will need to accept the online user agreement when you establish your account.
 
Please put an X by the plan you prefer and provide information about the primary contact on the account, which is the person who will administer the main account and any subaccounts. Also provide information on a billing contact if the person who processes payment is different from the primary contact. 
 

COURTNET 2.0 SUBSCRIPTION PLANS FOR MEDIA
(   ) Basic. Up to 45 cases per month, $15 monthly subscription fee w/$.50 overage, $.50 per image,
$10 per additional user
(   ) Advanced. Up to 175 cases per month, $50 monthly subscription fee w/$.50 overage, $.40 per image,
$10 per additional user
(   ) Professional. Up to 500 cases per month, $125 monthly subscription fee w/$.50 overage, $.30 per image, $10 per additional user
(   ) Enterprise. Up to 1,000 cases per month, $200 monthly subscription fee w/$.50 overage, $.10 per image,
$10 per additional user
 
CONTACT INFORMATION
Name of Media Outlet
Name of Primary Contact
Street Address
City, State, ZIP
Phone
Email
 
Name of Billing Contact
(if different from Primary Contact)
Billing Street Address
Billing City, State, ZIP
Billing Phone
Billing Email
 
For Assistance
If you have questions about setting up a CourtNet 2.0 account or using the application, contact courtnetadmin@kycourts.net or 502-573-2350, x50150. (Please do not respond to this email.)
 
With CourtNet 2.0, we’ve reached an important milestone in how records are accessed and shared within the Kentucky court system. The AOC has gotten great reviews on this application and I believe media outlets will benefit from this exceptional resource. I appreciate your interest in covering news related to the courts and the judiciary.
 
Laurie K. Dudgeon
Director
Administrative Office of the Courts
1001 Vandalay Drive
Frankfort, Kentucky 40601
502-573-2350

News: Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. testified before the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee about most pressing budgetary needs facing the Judicial Branch.

Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. testified before the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee today about what he considers the most pressing budgetary needs facing the Judicial Branch. The testimony took place at the Capitol Annex in Frankfort.

He said that the Judicial Branch’s funding request for Fiscal Years 2015 and 2016 focuses on four areas:
• Fund his top priority, which is the Judicial Branch Compensation Plan.
• Fund an adequate operating budget for the Judicial Branch.
• Fully fund the required employer cost of employee health insurance, retirement benefits and salary increments.
• Reinvest savings from House Bill 463 into the Judicial Branch.

Chief Justice Minton said that his primary concern is the ability to completely overhaul the Judicial Branch’s broken salary structure. Year of low wages and frozen salaries have left more than 800 of the 3,300 non-elected court employees under federal poverty guidelines for a family of four and an even greater number eligible for food stamps.

“It is simply unacceptable that so many of our employees work full time and still live in poverty,” Chief Justice Minton said.

“The other fallout from low wages is what I call the Judicial Branch brain drain,” he added. “We attract and train high-caliber employees whose dedication for the courts can’t withstand the enticement of higher salaries being offered by the private sector and the other branches of government. The ongoing turnover places a very real strain on the courts as we struggle to maintain a workforce that can continue to provide a high level of service.”

The Judicial Branch budget bill for the 2014-2016 fiscal biennium has been filed as House Bill 238. The bill requests $361.3 million for FY 2015 and $375.1 million for FY 2016. Chief Justice Minton said that an additional $10 million above the governor’s set-aside in each year of the fiscal biennium will allow the Judicial Branch to fully implement the proposed Compensation Plan.

Chief Justice Minton testified about the budget bill before the House Budget Review Subcommittee on Justice and the Judiciary earlier this month.

The chief justice is the administrative head of the state court system and is responsible for overseeing its operation. Chief Justice Minton was elected to the Supreme Court in 2006. His fellow justices elected him to serve a four-year term as chief justice in 2008 and re-elected him for a second term in 2012.

 

News: “Judicial Branch implements new expungement certification process”

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FRANKFORT, Ky., Feb. 5, 2014 – Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, state law requires every petition for expungement in Kentucky to include a certificate of eligibility for expungement. Under KRS 431.079, individuals who wish to have their criminal records expunged must complete the expungement certification process to determine if they are eligible for expungement. The certification provides judges and prosecutors with the most current and complete information available on a individual’s record.

KRS 431.079 is the enactment of Senate Bill 78, which was passed during the regular session of the 2013 General Assembly.

The Kentucky State Police are overseeing this process in conjunction with the Administrative Office of the Courts. Under the new law, both agencies must run criminal record reports on the person petitioning for the expungement. The KSP will then certify the eligibility of the expungement request.

Individuals can request certification through the AOC by registering online, by U.S. mail or in-person at the AOC Records Unit drive-thru window at 1001 Vandalay Drive in Frankfort. The certification costs $40 and the process takes up to 60 days. Those who obtain an expungement certification may then file a petition for expungement with the Office of Circuit Court Clerk in the county where the original charge was filed. The petition must be filed before the certification expires in 30 days.

Under the new process, judges will receive an expungement certification packet along with each petition for expungement. The certification ensures that judges can take into account an individual’s most up-to-date and comprehensive record information when determining whether to grant an expungement.

Individuals can visit the Kentucky Court of Justice website at http://courts.ky.gov/expungement to learn more about the expungement certification process. The site provides a list of frequently asked questions and describes the steps to submit a request online, in-person or by U.S. mail. The benefits for those applying electronically include email notifications throughout the process, the ability to check on the status of the certification online and the ability to download the certification packet as soon as it becomes available.

AOC: “Chief Justice Minton gives State of the Judiciary address before Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary”

Chief Justice John D. Minton, Jr. Supreme Court of Kentucky

Chief Justice John D. Minton, Jr.
Supreme Court of Kentucky

Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. presented the annual State of the Judiciary address before the General Assembly’s Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary on Oct. 4, 2013. His address is titled “The Changing Face of Kentucky Courts.”

Download (PDF, Unknown)

AOC News: Three names going up the Gov. Beshear to fill Court of Appeals Vacancy in 6th Appellate District, Division 1 – Jones, Molloy, Sanders

Court of Appeals        District Map

Court of Appeals
District Map

FRANKFORT, Ky. — The Judicial Nominating Commission, led by Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr., today announced nominees to fill the vacant Court of Appeals seat in the 6th Appellate District, Division 1. The district is composed of 21 counties in the Northern Kentucky area. The vacancy was created when Gov. Steve Beshear appointed Court of Appeals Judge Michelle M. Keller as a Supreme Court justice on April 3.

The three attorneys named as nominees to fill the vacancy are Allison Emerson Jones of Prospect, Mary Kathleen Molloy of Crescent Springs and Justin Aaron Sanders of Fort Wright.

Jones is an administrative law judge for the state Department of Workers’ Claims and previously served as an attorney for the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky. She received her juris doctor from the University of Kentucky College of Law.

Molloy is a partner in the law firm of Arnzen, Molloy & Storm and is associated with Amelia development as a limited partner in the development of residential real estate in Ohio. She received her juris doctor from Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law.

Sanders is a partner in The Sanders Law Firm. He received his juris doctor from the Pepperdine University School of Law in California.

The counties in the 6th Appellate District are Bath, Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Carroll, Fleming, Gallatin, Grant, Harrison, Henry, Kenton, Lewis, Mason, Nicholas, Oldham, Owen, Pendleton, Robertson, Shelby, Spencer and Trimble.

Justice Keller was appointed to the Supreme Court to fill the unexpired term of Justice Wil Schroder, who retired in January due to health issues.

AOC News: Judicial Nominating Commission announces nominees for vacant Harlan County judgeship

Harlan County Courthouse           Harlan, Kentucky

Harlan County Courthouse
Harlan, Kentucky

FRANKFORT, Ky. — The Judicial Nominating Commission, led by Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr., today announced nominees to fill the vacant Circuit Court judgeship in Harlan County, which is the 26th Judicial Circuit.

The three attorneys named as nominees to fill the vacancy are Sidney Barnes Douglass II of Loyall, H. Kent Hendrickson of Harlan and Henry Stuart Johnson of Baxter.

Douglass has a law practice at Douglass Law Office in Harlan. He served as a Harlan County Circuit Court judge from 1977 to 1984 and was previously the Harlan city attorney. He received his juris doctor from the University of Kentucky College of Law.

Hendrickson is a domestic relations commissioner for Harlan County Circuit Court and a partner in the law firm of Rice & Hendrickson and in Hendrickson Properties. He received his juris doctor from the University of Kentucky College of Law.

Johnson is in private law practice in Harlan and served as the commonwealth’s attorney for Harlan from 1992 until earlier this year. He received his juris doctor from the University of Kentucky College of Law.

The vacancy was created upon the removal of Russell D. Alred by the Judicial Conduct Commission as affirmed by the Supreme Court of Kentucky, effective Oct. 25, 2012.

KBA members invited to subscribe to new CourtNet 2.0

AOC Seal in GrayCourtNet KBA has been updated, but not without a price tag.  I am not surprised; nor am I complaining.  To have access to this information statewide on open and closed cases should pay for itself quickly. Here is the news announcement from the AOC:

The AOC is offering a new application to replace the current version of CourtNet KBA. Many of the new features were based on feedback from a group of attorneys who tested CourtNet 2.0 during a KBA pilot project.

KBA members are invited to subscribe to CourtNet 2.0 on a first-come, first serve basis.

AOC NEWS: Christian County Family Court Judge Jason Shea Fleming appointed to national, state committees on families and children

FRANKFORT, Ky., Sept. 27, 2011 – Christian County Family Court Judge Jason Shea Fleming has been appointed to a national committee and a state committee on families and children. Judge Fleming was named in August as an advisory member of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges’ Military Committee and as a member of the Kentucky Bar Association’s Child Protection and Domestic Violence Committee.   

 

“These appointments give Christian County a voice on issues that affect families and children in Kentucky and nationally,” Judge Fleming said. “My role on the Military Committee will help me better serve our military families stationed right here at Fort Campbell. It is an honor to be selected for these important committees.”

 

The NCJFCJ Military Committee works to better understand issues common to military families and their children in the areas of delinquency, dependency, domestic violence and family law. The committee aims to identify and define issues that the NCJFCJ can help address through collaboration and the creation of effective strategies and protocols. The group is also charged with developing and implementing training and educational tools for judges and court personnel.

 

The KBA Child Protection and Domestic Violence Committee reviews the various legal aspects surrounding juvenile issues. The committee’s work has included publication of a handbook on children’s rights.

 

Judge Fleming

Judge Fleming was elected in November 2006 to serve as the Family Court judge for Christian County. Prior to his judicial career, Judge Fleming was assistant Christian County attorney from 1998 to 2006 and served as the director of Christian County Juvenile Services and as a volunteer for Christian County Juvenile Drug Court from 2000 to 2006. He was in private practice with Thomas, Arvin & Fleming in Hopkinsville from 1997 to 2000 and had a solo practice from 2000 to 2003.

 

Judge Fleming holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kentucky and a juris doctor from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where he graduated cum laude and was a member of the Order of the Coif. He was articles editor for the Kentucky Law Journal and chair of the Hearing Committee on the UK College of Law Honor Council from 1996 to 1997.

 

Judge Fleming is the 2011 recipient of the KBA’s Outstanding Young Lawyer Award. He previously received the KBA’s Continuing Legal Education Recognition Award and has been the recipient of the KBA’s Pro Bono Award multiple times. He is the only prosecutor to receive the Kentucky Public Advocate Award, presented to him in 2006 by the Department of Public Advocacy. He also received the Advocate for Children Award from the Christian County Child Abuse Council in 2010 and the 2007 Meritorious Service Award from Christian County Juvenile Drug Court.

 

He has authored numerous journal articles and been a presenter at conferences for Kentucky prosecutors and county attorneys at continuing legal education seminars statewide and for the KBA Convention. He serves as a member of the state Circuit Judges Education Committee and the Education Oversight Committee for the Administrative Office of the Courts. Judge Fleming has also been a part-time instructor for Brown-Mackie College.

 

He is a past president of the Hopkinsville-Christian County Jaycees and Big Brothers-Big Sisters of the Southern Pennyrile. Judge Fleming is a past vice president of the Kentucky State Jaycees and was the organization’s legal counsel for six years. He is a past chairman for the boards of the Housing Authority of Hopkinsville and Westwood Senior Homes.

Supreme Court of Kentucky adopts statewide rules for family law cases

Links to Related Resources:
Family Court Rules of Procedure and Practice
Summary of Family Court Rules of Procedures and Practice

FRANKFORT, Ky. — For the first time, the Supreme Court of Kentucky has adopted uniform rules for family law cases statewide, Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. and Deputy Chief Justice Mary C. Noble announced at a news conference today at the Kentucky Capitol.

The Family Court Rules of Procedure and Practice apply to all family law cases, which are handled by Family Court judges in 71 Kentucky counties and by circuit and district judges in the 49 other counties without a Family Court. Family law cases include such matters as divorce, termination of parental rights, domestic violence, child support, juvenile status offenses, adoption, and dependency, neglect or abuse.

The rules became effective Jan. 1, 2011, and will have a significant impact on the practice of family law in Kentucky.